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89th Regiment of Foot - Officer, Battalion Company, 1793
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89th Regiment of Foot - Officer, Battalion Company, 1793

Measurements: Overall: 39.5cm (15.5in) x 29cm (11.5in)

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An Edwardian watercolour and gouache study of an 89th Foot officer. Signed lower right R. Simkin. Framed and glazed.

The regiment was raised in Dublin by Major-General William Crosbie as the 89th Regiment of Foot, in response to the threat posed by the French Revolution, on 3 December 1793.[1] The regiment was sent to join the Duke of York's army in the Netherlands in summer 1794 as part of the unsuccessful defence of that country against the Republican French during the Flanders Campaign.[2] It was posted to Ireland and, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lord Blayney,[3] it saw action at the Battle of Vinegar Hill in June 1798 during the rebellion.[2] The regiment became known for its perseverance in hunting down Irish rebels earning the nickname "Blayney's Bloodhounds".[4] It was posted to Malta in 1800 and arrived in Egypt in March 1801 for service in the Egyptian Campaign.[2] It saw action at the Battle of Alexandria later that month at the Siege of Cairo in April 1801.

Richard Simkin (1850–1926) born in Kent, was a soldier in a London volunteer regiment and studied at the Heatherley School of  Art. He was employed by the War Office designing recruiting posters and providing illustrations for the Army and Navy Gazette. He married in 1880 and lived for six years at Aldershot before moving to Herne Bay. An authority on British military uniforms, he depicted imperial and colonial troops to create such series as Types of the Indian Army for the Army and Navy Gazette in 1901, having gained much first hand information at the Colonial and India Exhibition of 1886. During his lifetime, he contributed illustrations to numerous publications including The Graphic and Boy’s Own Magazine.

 
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