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A Standing Figure of George III by Gahagan, 1818
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A Standing Figure of George III by Gahagan, 1818

Measurements: Height: 28.5cm (11in)

£3300

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Polychromed plaster standing figure of King George III wearing the Windsor uniform he introduced in 1777 for the male members of the Royal Family when at Windsor Castle, with Garter Star, cream waistcoat and ochre breeches, holding a cane in his right hand, and raised on a naturalistic octagonal base.

The present figure of George III is identical to an example in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
inscribed ‘L. GAHAGAN / fecit & Published / as the Act Directs’, indicating Gahagan’s claim to copyright of 14 years as granted under the statute of Queen Anne in 1710. L. Gahagan may refer to Lawrence Gahagan (active 1756 -1820) or his son Lucius Gahagan (1773-1855). Lawrence Geoghegan is first recorded in Dublin in 1756. He later moved to London where he anglicized his name to Gahagan and exhibited at the Royal Academy, a bust of Nelson, who sat for him no less than seven times. Lawrence Gahagan also produced bronzes of Wellington, Prince Blucher and other leading men of the day. In 1762 he married Phoebe Hunter, by whom he had four sons, Charles (born c1765) and Lucius, Vincent (1776-1832) and Sebastian Gahagan (1779-1838), several of whom were also involved in the family sculpture studio in London. It is not known whether Lawrence remained in London or, like Lucius, moved to Bath, where the latter lived from 1820 until his death in a house called ‘Lo Studio’. Lucius trained under his father and also worked in Dublin. Much of his work was in collaboration with his father and signed ‘L.Gahagan’, making it virtually impossible to tell the work of one from the other. Their patronage was at an exalted level and achieved a widespread popularity through the production of marble sculpture, bronzes and plaster casts. Few examples of their work in the softer materials survive, making the present figure a rare find.
 

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