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A Victorian 2nd Life Guards Mounted Hoof Inkwell, 1867
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A Victorian 2nd Life Guards Mounted Hoof Inkwell, 1867

Measurements: Length: 17cm (6.5in)

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A large hoof from a 2nd Life Guards charger adorned with silver plated shoe and mount with lidded compartment containing a glass liner, the lid inscribed - ‘Half Caste / Winner 2nd Life Guards / Challenge Cup / 1867 / 1868’. Maker’s name of Halstaff & Hannaford, 228 Regent Street, London to the rim of the well.

Half-Caste was owned and ridden by Captain Henry ‘Croppy’ Ewart (1838-1928) who later came to fame as the commander of the Household Cavalry in the Moonlight Charge at the Battle of Kassassin in the Egyptian Campaign of 1882. Ewart purchased his commission in 1858, and in the 1880s was a favourite of the Prince of Wales. Ewart subsequently commanded the Cavalry Brigade in the Suakin Expeditionary Force sent against the Mahdist forces of Osman Digna in 1884 and 1885, for which he was created a Knight Commander of the Bath. From 1884 to 1894 he was Crown Equerry to Queen Victoria and later fulfilled the same role for Edward VII. He was appointed Colonel of the 7th Dragoon Guards in 1900 and after their amalgamation continued as a joint Colonel of the 4th/7th D.G. until his death in April 1928 at the age of 90. Ewart married in 1888 Lady Evelyn Clementina Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, daughter of Gilbert Heathcote-Drummond-Willoughby, 1st Earl of Ancaster. Their only son, Victor Alexander Ewart, was killed in action at the Battle of Jutland in 1916.

Source: Sporting Life, 8.4.1865.
 

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