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A Westminster Abbey Admission Ticket to the Coronation of George IV, 1821
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A Westminster Abbey Admission Ticket to the Coronation of George IV, 1821

Measurements: Overall: 34cm (13.5in) x 36cm (14in)

£550

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Printed by James Whiting and Robert Branston in black and blue inks showing the King seated on throne with classical maidens, laurels, and coat of arms, (this being a fine and early example of the bicoloured security printing developed by Sir William Congreve) all within a blind stamped border by the firm of Dobbs & Kidd, additionally embossed in base with the Royal seal. Signed to the lower right by the Deputy Earl Marshal of England at the Coronation, Lord Howard of Effingham (1767–1845), and inscribed no ‘4432’ and ‘North Door / Upper Boxes’ to the lower left. 23cm (9in) x 25cm (10in).

Kenneth Alexander Howard, 11th Baron Howard of Effingham, served as a regimental officer with The Coldstream Regiment of Foot Guards in the Flanders Campaign of 1793. He later he became a Divisional Commander under Wellington in the Peninsular War. He was made a Knight of the Bath and, in 1816, was appointed Colonel of the 70th Regiment by the Prince Regent.

Immediately after the Coronation, he participated in the ceremonial in Westminster Hall, where, three hundred and twelve guests sat down to dine, watched by the peeresses in the gallery.  Together with the Duke of Wellington, Howard of Effingham rode into hall escorting the hereditary King’s champion of England, Mr. Dymoke, attired in full armour and riding a horse, which had been hired from Astley's circus. Duke of Wellington, Howard of Effingham rode into hall escorting the hereditary King’s champion of England, Mr. Dymoke, attired in full armour and riding a horse, which had been hired from Astley's circus. When it came time for the King’s champion to his leave, his horse reared up rather than backed out, and in the end had to be ignominiously pulled from the hall by its tail.


 

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