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An Edward VII Royal Coachman’s State Livery Aiguilette, 1902
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An Edward VII Royal Coachman’s State Livery Aiguilette, 1902

Measurements: Length: 80cm (32in)

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Braided shoulder cords terminating in gilt brass tips suspended from an embroidered bullion wire EVIIR cypher for Edward VII (reigned 1901-1910) on a blue velvet ground encircled by the Garter, fringed with bullion wire and surmounted by the imperial state crown. As worn on the left shoulder of a Royal Coachman’s livery on State occasions. 

The King’s Coachman was the senior post in the Royal Mews. His primary duty was to personally drive the King four-in-hand from the box seat of one of the State Coaches which on ceremonial occasions are covered with a richly embroidered hammercloth. Not all State Coaches require a coachman, these include the Gold State Coach, the Scottish State Coach, the Diamond Jubilee State Coach, for instance. These are driven by postillions who control the horse teams while mounted directly on one of the drawing horses. The Irish State Coach and the Queen Alexandra’s State Coach are examples of the Royal Mews’ carriages that require a coachman. A regular duty of the latter is to carry the Imperial State Crown to Westminster for the State Opening of Parliament.

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