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Body Guard of the Honourable Corps of Gentleman at Arms, 1937
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Body Guard of the Honourable Corps of Gentleman at Arms, 1937

Mid 20th Century

Measurements: Height: 30cm (12in)

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This figure dates the coronation year of 1937 and represents Brigadier-General George William St.George Grogan, V.C., C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O. & Bar, (1875-1962), late Worcestershire Regiment. The figure bears the FM mark indicating it was retailed by Fortnum & Mason. Figures with this mark are noticeably superior to many earlier and later figures made at the Sächsische Porzellan Manufaktur Dresden. General Grogan won the Victoria Cross in the Third Battle of Aisne for his spirited three day defence of a hill above the River Vesle at Jonchery during 27–29 May 1918, having a horse shot from under him and leading his troops with complete disregard for his own safety.
 
Provenance: General Raymond Eliot Lee, U.S. Army

General Raymond E. Lee (d.1957) was the Anglophile military attache at the U.S. Embassy in London during the crucial war years of 1940 and 1941. Eschewing uniform for Savile Row suits he was regarded as cultured individual with close ties to the British intelligence establishment. His published London war diary records observations of morale, daily life and Luftwaffe bombing, together with his thoughts on the military situation and details of his discussions with a wide range of senior British military and civilian staff and politicians. After completing his stint in Britain he returned to the US, arriving on December 7th 1941 to be met with the news of Pearl Harbour.

 

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