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East India Company Naval Officer’s Sword, 1852
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East India Company Naval Officer’s Sword, 1852

Measurements: Length: 89cm (35in)

£1850

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Steel blade (72cm 28.25in) etched with scrolling foliage, the East India Company crest ( ademi lion rampant guardant or, supporting between the paws a regal crown proper) and a foul anchor, copper gilt gothic type hilt with bold lion’s head pommel, solid half-basket guard with raised bars E.I.C. crest and initials E.I.C. crest and foul anchor badge, inner folding guard, wire bound fish skin grip, and lion’s head pommel complete with leathered scabbard with engraved gilt brass mounts and two suspension rings.

The present sword conforms broadly to the 1827 Royal Navy pattern but is but bears the insignia of the East India Company’s maritime service. From its origins in 1612 the East India Company's naval forces underwent various changes to its name. Over time it was named the Bombay Marine (1686), the Bombay Marine Corps (1829), the Indian Navy (1830), Her Majesty's Indian Navy (1858), the Bombay and Bengal Marine (1863). Following the capture of Aden (1839), service operated the Indus Flotilla to prevent attacks by pirates against British shipping to India. It also took part in the First Opium War (1840); the siege of Multan during the Second Sikh War (1848). Ships of the Indian Navy assisted in the capture of Martaban and Rangoon during the Second Burma War. During the Indian Mutiny of 1 the Indian Navy supplied a field force to the British forces besieging rebel held Delhi (1857). After the end of Company rule, the Indian Navy was placed under the control of the British Government of India and was formally re-titled Her Majesty's Indian Navy in 1858.

The London firm of Maynard, Harris & Grice began as an importer of Indian textiles and expanded to become East India agents and outfitters to those travelling to the East. Their services included the ‘Supply of entire Outfits for Ladies and Gentlemen’, that included an ‘improved Invention for Cabin Furniture’. Known by the name of Maynard, Harris and Grice between 1852 and 1858, the firm occupied extensive premises at 126 Leadenhall Street in the City of London, conveniently placed for visitors to the Honourable East India Company’s headquarters, East India House at 61 Leadenhall Street.

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