Enquire

To enquire about this item please enter your details below and we will contact you shortly.

(Your details will not be shared with any third parties)

Tick the box below if you would like to receive the Armoury of St James's Bulletin - a quarterly e-newsletter that showcases an exclusive selection of the latest military antiques offered at our premises in Piccadilly Arcade.

Please note that your details are used solely for dealing with your enquiry and will not be sold or passed on to any third parties.

Ireland - A Queen Alexandra Royal Presentation Brooch
Hover over image to zoom, click to expand.

Ireland - A Queen Alexandra Royal Presentation Brooch

Circa 1903

Measurements: Height: 26mm x 30mm

SOLD

Enquire

Interlaced double ‘A’ cypher of Queen Alexandra (1844-1925) in 14 carat gold set with guilloche enamel within a gold lozenge set with two diamonds, contained within a gold and white enamel bead border, the points embellished with shamrocks set with green and white enamel, the sides adorned with gold s-scrollwork, all beneath the Imperial State Crown in gold and enamels. Contained in a fitted case by the Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company, 112 Regent Street, London.

The present brooch reflects Queen Alexandra’s noted sympathy for Ireland and its people. On her arrival in England from her native Denmark as the bride-to-be of the Prince of Wales, Alexandra chose to wear dress from Irish looms. It was the first of many acts that demonstrated interested support for Ireland from an otherwise distant Royal Family. When she visited Ireland in 1868, following the refusal of the Dublin Corporation to erect a statue of Prince Albert, she won hearts as she gazed at rain soaked beauty sites, listened to speeches and visited orphanages and schools. In the midst of the fiery visit of 1885, fraught with tensions around the The Land League and Home Rule Bill, she became a model for a more active relationship between the Irish and the Crown. As Queen in 1903, when the Dublin Corporation refused an official reception and the visit coincided with the death of Pope Leo XIII, the royal standard was lowered and condolences extended to Irish clergy, winning much support. King Edward and Queen Alexandra attended military reviews, glittering receptions and travelled aboard a locally made carriage for the royal train. The royal motor car however, was less reliable. It broke down while meeting and greeting the natives in the wilds of Connemara. Such was the perceived success of this and previous visits that upon her death in 1925 she was remarked upon as having been unique in the dynasty and as a true friend of Ireland.


 

Enquire