A Pair of Silver Dishes from the Golden Age of Big Yacht Racing, 1903
A Pair of Silver Dishes from the Golden Age of Big Yacht Racing, 1903
A Pair of Silver Dishes from the Golden Age of Big Yacht Racing, 1903
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A Pair of Silver Dishes from the Golden Age of Big Yacht Racing, 1903

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Diameter: 85mm (3.25in)

Silver and enamels. The centre of the thinly worked dishes enamelled with the burgees of the Kaiserlicher Yacht-Club, Kiel and the Royal Yacht Squadron, Cowes. Maker’s mark of George Unite. Hallmarked 1903.

The burgees of the Kaiserlicher Yacht-Club (Imperial Yacht Club) and the Royal Yacht Squadron are synonymous with the heyday of big yacht racing before the First World War. The Prince of Wales was Commodore of R.Y.S. from 1882-1900, and it was through a subtext of royal yacht racing that that Anglo-German rivalries were played out to the full.  The accidental death of the K.Y.C. member Baron Moritz Curt von Zedtwitz in a closely fought race off Southsea during Cowes Week 1896, and the apparent superiority of the Kaiser’s Meteor over the Prince of Wales’s Britannia proved a defining moment. The prestigious K.Y.C. being some seventy years younger than the R.Y.S., was originally a naval club but in 1891 it widened its membership to include the likes of the armaments magnate Friedrich Alfred Krupp and welcomed the Kaiser as its commodore. No less than 455 members of the Imperial club perished in the Great War, yet it retained its title and commodore until taken over by the Nazis in the late 1930s.

Diameter: 85mm (3.25in)

Silver and enamels. The centre of the thinly worked dishes enamelled with the burgees of the Kaiserlicher Yacht-Club, Kiel and the Royal Yacht Squadron, Cowes. Maker’s mark of George Unite. Hallmarked 1903.

The burgees of the Kaiserlicher Yacht-Club (Imperial Yacht Club) and the Royal Yacht Squadron are synonymous with the heyday of big yacht racing before the First World War. The Prince of Wales was Commodore of R.Y.S. from 1882-1900, and it was through a subtext of royal yacht racing that that Anglo-German rivalries were played out to the full.  The accidental death of the K.Y.C. member Baron Moritz Curt von Zedtwitz in a closely fought race off Southsea during Cowes Week 1896, and the apparent superiority of the Kaiser’s Meteor over the Prince of Wales’s Britannia proved a defining moment. The prestigious K.Y.C. being some seventy years younger than the R.Y.S., was originally a naval club but in 1891 it widened its membership to include the likes of the armaments magnate Friedrich Alfred Krupp and welcomed the Kaiser as its commodore. No less than 455 members of the Imperial club perished in the Great War, yet it retained its title and commodore until taken over by the Nazis in the late 1930s.