A Signed Royal Presentation Portrait of H.M. The Queen, 1969
A Signed Royal Presentation Portrait of H.M. The Queen, 1969
A Signed Royal Presentation Portrait of H.M. The Queen, 1969
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Signed Royal Presentation Portrait of H.M. The Queen, 1969
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Signed Royal Presentation Portrait of H.M. The Queen, 1969
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Signed Royal Presentation Portrait of H.M. The Queen, 1969

A Signed Royal Presentation Portrait of H.M. The Queen, 1969

SOLD
Tax included.

Overall: 31cm (12.25in) x 24cm (9.5in)

Photograph by royal photographer Anthony Buckley. Signed by the Queen on the mount and dated 1969. In glazed, gilt tooled brown leather easel backed frame by Jarrolds of Knightsbridge.

Anthony Buckley (1912-1993) opened his first portrait studio in 1937 and he quickly gained a reputation for his portraits of leading actresses of the day. After serving in World War II, he worked from a studio on St Alban's Street and then in the 1950s on New Bond Street, when he purchased the premises and business of Janet Jevons. In the early 1950s he worked in the London studio of royal photographer Dorothy Wilding. His reputation as a leading stage portraitist grew rapidly. In the 1960s he moved to Grosvenor Street, an address that better reflected his enhanced status as a royal photographer. His prints spanning the years 1937-75 were donated to the National Portrait Gallery in 1995.

Overall: 31cm (12.25in) x 24cm (9.5in)

Photograph by royal photographer Anthony Buckley. Signed by the Queen on the mount and dated 1969. In glazed, gilt tooled brown leather easel backed frame by Jarrolds of Knightsbridge.

Anthony Buckley (1912-1993) opened his first portrait studio in 1937 and he quickly gained a reputation for his portraits of leading actresses of the day. After serving in World War II, he worked from a studio on St Alban's Street and then in the 1950s on New Bond Street, when he purchased the premises and business of Janet Jevons. In the early 1950s he worked in the London studio of royal photographer Dorothy Wilding. His reputation as a leading stage portraitist grew rapidly. In the 1960s he moved to Grosvenor Street, an address that better reflected his enhanced status as a royal photographer. His prints spanning the years 1937-75 were donated to the National Portrait Gallery in 1995.