Coach Panel of the 1st Earl and Countess of Mulgrave, 1825
Coach Panel of the 1st Earl and Countess of Mulgrave, 1825
Coach Panel of the 1st Earl and Countess of Mulgrave, 1825
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Coach Panel of the 1st Earl and Countess of Mulgrave, 1825
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Coach Panel of the 1st Earl and Countess of Mulgrave, 1825
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Coach Panel of the 1st Earl and Countess of Mulgrave, 1825

Coach Panel of the 1st Earl and Countess of Mulgrave, 1825

SOLD
Tax included.

Overall: 22.8cm x (8.9in) x 17.8cm (7in) 

Polychrome coach panel displaying the arms of Henry Phipps, created 1st Earl Mulgrave in 1812, impaling those of his wife Martha Sophia, daughter of pottery manufacturer Christopher Thomson Maling. Under a earl’s coronet, the arms of Phipps (sable a trefoil between eight mullets [stars] argent) are quartered with those of the Earl’s mother Lady Catherine Annessley, daughter of the 3rd Earl of Anglesey by his wife Lady Catherine Darnley, illegitimate daughter of James II of England by Catherine Sedley, Countess of Dorchester. In 1688 shortly before King James fled England, he had his daughter’s arms registered, assigning her the Royal arms within a blue and white border, as displayed here in the 3rd quarter. The coach panel contained in period rosewood frame.

Read more 

Henry Phipps, later Lord Mulgrave (1755-1831) was Foreign Secretary under William Pitt and as as such helped Pitt to form the Third Coalition against Napoleon. He held several major offices of state during the Napoleonic Wars  had an interesting career as a soldier diplomat during the French Revolutionary War. Educated Eton and the Middle Temple, Phipps entered the army in 1775, and saw service in the Caribbean during the American Revolutionary War. In 1793 he was made Colonel of the 31st (Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot. In that same year, he was on a mission to the King of Sardinia in Turin when British forces captured the French port of Toulon. His proximity and rank gave him command of the British land forces before withdrawing upon the arrival of more senior officers. In 1799 he was sent out on another special military mission, this time to the headquarters of the Austrian commander, Archduke Charles, to attempt to persuade him to retain his troops in Switzerland rather than removing them to the Middle Rhine, but he was unsuccessful.

Phipps was elected to Parliament for Totnes in 1784 and was a loyal supporter of Pitt. In 1790, he was elected for Scarborough in Yorkshire. He succeeded his brother Constantine Phipps, 2nd Baron Mulgrave as Baron Mulgrave in the Peerage of Ireland in 1792, but did not succeed to his brother's British title. In 1794 he was granted a British peerage as Baron Mulgrave, entering the House of Lords, and in 1796 he was made Governor of Scarborough Castle. Mulgrave supported Pitt when he resigned in 1801, and in return for his loyalty was rewarded with the office of Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (1804–1805) in Pitt's second government. 

The post of Foreign Secretary was generally thought to be beyond his powers but proved himself capable in debate. On 11 February 1805 he had to announce the breach with Spain, and to defend the seizure of the treasure ships at Ferrol before the declaration of war, and on 20 June to defend the coalition of 1805. He composed an ode on the victory of Trafalgar, and it was set to music by Thomas Arne. With the death of Pitt and the formation of the Ministry of All the Talents in 1806, Mulgrave, along with the other Pittites, went into opposition, but when the Pittites returned to power in 1807, Mulgrave served in various major offices, first as First Lord of the Admiralty (1807–1810), then as Master-General of the Ordnance (1810–1819), and finally as Minister without Portfolio (1819–1820). As First Lord he was heavily involved in planning both the successful expedition against Copenhagen in 1807, and the disastrous one to Walcheren in 1809. After moving to the ordnance board, Mulgrave became less active politically. In 1812, he was created Viscount Normanby and Earl of Mulgrave in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.