Royal Presentation Portrait of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, 1963
Royal Presentation Portrait of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, 1963
Royal Presentation Portrait of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, 1963
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Royal Presentation Portrait of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, 1963
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Royal Presentation Portrait of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, 1963
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Royal Presentation Portrait of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, 1963

Royal Presentation Portrait of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh, 1963

SOLD
Tax included.

Overall: 33cm (13in) x 25.5cm (10in)

Provenance: Air Vice Marshal Donald Attlee, C.B., L.V.O., D.L.

Black and white full length portrait photograph of the Queen and the Duke photographed at Buckingham Palace. Signed in the mount ‘Elizabeth R’ and ‘Philip’, and dated ‘1963’. In navy blue leather frame by Royal warrant holder H.H. Plante, of Bury Street, St. James’s, London. Together with accompanying official covering letter from Lieutenant-Colonel Martin Charteris, (afterwards Lord Charteris of Amisfield), the long serving Assistant Private Secretary to the Sovereign, to the recipient Wing Commander D.L. Attlee. 

Read more 

Air Vice-Marshal Donald Attlee (1922-2021) was a nephew of the Labour prime minister and wartime cabinet minister 1st Earl Attlee. Between 1960 and 1963 he was Commanding Officer, The Queen's Flight. In 1961 he was temporarily detained by the French authorities at an airfield in Mali when on a ‘testing flight’ to assess the route for a Royal visit to Ghana. When the resulting Royal visit ended Attlee returned to Britain with Prince Philip acting as co-pilot. During the Cold War, Attlee was involved with an operation that centred on the recovery of secret RADAR equipment installed in a Russian Yak fighter which crashed into Lake Stoessensee in the British sector of West Berlin in 1966. In an operation typical of the period, the Russians were stalled while the ‘unrecoverable’ RADAR was removed and sent to the royal aeronautical Establishment at Farnborough for evaluation; while the rest of the wreckage and the deceased crew were returned to the Soviet Union.