Signed Presentation Portrait Photograph of Admiral Beatty, 1919
Signed Presentation Portrait Photograph of Admiral Beatty, 1919
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Signed Presentation Portrait Photograph of Admiral Beatty, 1919
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Signed Presentation Portrait Photograph of Admiral Beatty, 1919

Signed Presentation Portrait Photograph of Admiral Beatty, 1919

SOLD
Tax included.

Overall: 24.7cm (9.7in) x 17.8cm (7in)

 

Quarter length studio portrait of Admiral of the Fleet Sir David (later 1st Earl) Beatty (1871-1936) in uniform with cap sported at a customarily jaunty angle. The photograph by Speaight of New Bond Street, London, signed in ink in the lower mount ‘Beatty’ the admiral’s hand, suggesting a date after he was created Earl Beatty, Viscount Borodale of Wexford in the County of Wexford, Baron Beatty of the North Sea and of Brooksby in the County of Leicester on 18 October 1919.

Read more 

In March 1913 Rear Admiral Beatty was appointed to the command of the 1st Battlecruiser Squadron hoisting his flag in H.M.S. Lion. Prior to the outbreak of war his squadron visited Russia in June, where amidst much protocol the Tsar and his ill-fated family were entertained to lunch aboard Lion while in Kronstadt. Following the outbreak of war Beatty continued in Lion commanding the 1st B.C.S. in the Battles of Heligoland Bight (1914), Dogger Bank (1915), and Jutland (1916) where he famously commented to his flag captain, "There seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today", after two of his ships exploded. Thereafter his aggressive approach was contrasted with the caution of his superior Admiral Jellicoe. He succeeded Jellicoe as Commander-in-Chief of the Grand Fleet in November 1916, and transferred his flag to H.M.S. Iron Duke, which at the time was in dry dock upgrading the armour so plainly lacking at Jutland. Iron Duke remained his flagship until January 1917 when he transferred to H.M.S. Queen Elizabeth in which he received the surrender of the German High Seas Fleet on 18 November 1918.