Study of a Second Life Guards Trooper, 1900
Study of a Second Life Guards Trooper, 1900
Study of a Second Life Guards Trooper, 1900
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Study of a Second Life Guards Trooper, 1900
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Study of a Second Life Guards Trooper, 1900
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Study of a Second Life Guards Trooper, 1900

Study of a Second Life Guards Trooper, 1900

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Overall: 44cm (17.5in) x 34cm (13.5in)

 

Watercolour on paper. Titled ‘A Trooper 2nd Life Guards’, the subject jauntily depicted in stable jacket with signaller’s badge over a two years good conduct stripe on the lower left sleeve, forage cap and swagger stick. Signed lower left ‘Cecil Brown’. Framed and glazed. Image: 25cm (6.5in) x 16cm (9.75in).

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Major Cecil Hew Brown (1868-1926) was an equestrian artist and sometime member of the Middlesex Hussars Yeomanry.  Born in Ayr, Scotland, he was educated at Harrow and Exeter College, Oxford, and received his artistic training in London and Paris. He began his career as a painter but turned to sculpture in the 1890s, concentrating on equestrian subjects reflecting his personal interests in hunting and horses. In 1913 he designed a medal for the International Medical Congress of London. Too old in August 1914 at 46 for regimental service, Brown's military experience and knowledge of horses secured him a commission in October as Second Lieutenant, Army Service Corps, 2nd South Midland Mounted Brigade Transport and Supply Column. He served in Egypt from March 1915, and remained with the brigade's horses when the men were ordered to Gallipoli. After the destruction of 2nd S.M.M.B. on Scimitar Hill and the reorganisation of troops returning from Gallipoli, Cecil Brown was gazetted to the Imperial Camel Corps, then tasked with patrolling the Western Desert and Northern Sudan, an appointment that led to his most most important sculptural commission, the Imperial Camel Corps memorial on Victoria Embankment Gardens, London, which was unveiled on 22 July 1921. From 1920 he was art master at Bedford School. In 1926 it was reported that he died whilst out hunting with the Oakley Hounds near Keysoe, having fallen from his horse.