A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George V, 1911
A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George V, 1911
A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George V, 1911
A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George V, 1911
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A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George V, 1911

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Length: 76cm (30in)

Polychromed wood painted with the state imperial crown over the GRV cypher and coronation regalia, as issued as a staff of office to those who acted ushers in Westminster Abbey on Coronation Day 1911.

Gold Staff Officers were selected and deployed by the Duke of Norfolk as the hereditary Earl Marshals of England since at least the coronation of George III in 1761. In 1911 the Earl Marshal was swamped with applications though it was estimate only 150 would be required, each being equipped with a ceremonial baton.

Their duties in Westminster Abbey, it was reported were of ‘an intensely interesting character and consisted in seeing the guests to their places and looking alter them whilst there. These officials had to be on duty between 5 and 6 o'clock in the morning before the Abbey was opened to the invited guests, and they were not relieved from their posts until about 3.30, when they were entertained by the Earl Marshal to lunch at the House of Lords. The officers were the recipients of very handsome badges and a staff, which they are allowed to keep as souvenirs of the ceremony.’