Admission Ticket To The Funeral of the 1st Duke of Wellington, 1852
Admission Ticket To The Funeral of the 1st Duke of Wellington, 1852
Admission Ticket To The Funeral of the 1st Duke of Wellington, 1852
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Admission Ticket To The Funeral of the 1st Duke of Wellington, 1852

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Overall: 20cm (8in) x 27cm (10.75in) 

Printed card with ink inscriptions. Decorated with Greek key border and ducal coronet, and named to W. Jackson, M.P., for a place in the ‘Centre area under the Dome’ for the Iron Duke’s funeral at St. Paul’s Cathedral  on 18 November 1852. Contained verre eglomise frame.

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, was laid to rest in St Paul's in a State Funeral on 18 November 1852. It was one of the most spectacular London events of the 19th century. The body was received at St. Paul’s Cathedral by the Dean of St Paul’s, Henry Milman with clergy and choir at the West Door, and conducted to the central area under the Dome, giving Mr. Jackson a ring side seat. The pall was borne by eight of the most distinguished surviving general officers who had fought under the Duke’s command. The congregation included both Houses of Parliament in full, and a huge contingent of foreign and British dignitaries and civic authorities. When the congregation was asked to repeat the Lord's Prayer - Dean Milman thought it comparable to the Biblical phrase 'like the roar of many waters’. Finally, the Duke's coffin was lowered into the Crypt, towards the black sarcophagus of a previous arrival, Admiral Lord Nelson. In Milman’s words: ‘the gradual disappearance of the coffin, as it slowly sank into the vault below, was a sight which will hardly pass from the memory of those who witnessed it.’

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Sir William Jackson, 1st Baronet (1805-1876), rose to become one of the richest commoners in England. He was a railway entrepreneur and onetime business partner of Robert Stephenson. He made a fortune in palm oil, and was Liberal Member of Parliament for Newcastle-under-Lyme. He was a friend to Sir Joseph Paxton, and the radical orator John Bright (1811-1889). He left £50 to Bright to drink to his health.