Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930
Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930
Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930
Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930

Maharajah of Rajpipla Presentation Photograph Frame, 1930

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Measurements: 25cm (9.9in) x 15.6cm (6.1in)

Silver of rectangular form with engine turned decoration, the arched top accommodating the arms of the Maharaja of Rajpipla as borne by His Highness Sir Vijaysinhji. Arms: Azure, on a pale wavy between two galleys Argent, three cannon Gules, pointed to the sinister. Crest: On a helmet to the dexter, lambrequined Azure and Argent, a bull statant. Supporters: Two Bhils armed with bow and arrow. Motto: Rewah Jine Kanté). Maker’s mark of Royal Warrant holder Mappin & Webb, of Regent Street London, and Bombay. Hallmarked London 1935. Leather covered easel back. Glazed.

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H.H. Maharaja Sir Vijaysinhji of Rajpipla, K.C.S.I., G.B.E., (1890-1951), aka ‘Mr Pip’, was a well known figure in British racing circles and to the wider public as the owner of the 1929 Epsom Derby winner Windsor Lad. Born at Chatravilas Palace, Nandod, he was educated at Rajkumar College, Rajkot, and succeeded his father in 1915. As a youth he served in the Imperial Cadet Corps at Dehra Dun, and in 1919 became an Honorary Captain in the 27th Light Cavalry, Indian Army (retitled 16th Light Cavalry in 1922).  A social reformer, he worked to modernise his state and became a leading member of the Chamber of Princes until Rajpipla merged with the Indian Union in 1948. In his heyday he fielded a royal polo team comprising himself and his three sons. ‘Mr Pip’ moved with ease in European society and was befriended by British royals and celebrities alike. After the loss of his state he settled permanently at his English home, The Manor at Old Windsor, where he died in 1951.