A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794
A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794
A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794
A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794
A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794

A Naval Reward Badge - ‘The Glorious First of June’ Gold Anchor, 1794

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Overall: 43mm x 29mm x 0.5mm 

Gold. Made in commemoration of Earl Howe’s Victory over the French Republic’s Atlantic Fleet under Rear Admiral Villaret-Joyeuse on 1 June 1794; the anchor stock inscribed 'Earl Howe' to the obverse, and  'June 1st 1794' to the reverse. Cased.

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An example dated to 1794 with the same inscription is in the National Maritime Museum (ID: ZBA4844). The NMM example is described thus: ‘Miniature gold alloy foul anchor with a suspension ring. Cut from piece of sheet metal, the details of the rope have been engraved on the front of the item. It is inscribed ‘Earl Howe’ on the stock and ‘June 1, 1794’ across the arms. It was formerly the property of Rear-Admiral George Fowke (1767-1832) who was present at the Battle of the Glorious 1st June 1794 as a lieutenant on HMS 'Barfleur'. The item was stored on arrival in a green velvet-covered presentation box with a glazed lid and back, designed to hold a medal and chain.’

Prior to the general award of naval medals, anchor badges are known to have been worn in commemoration of important naval victories. In his book British Naval Medals, Admiral Lord Milford Haven states ‘badges of these patterns were originally made from captured bronze guns by order of Lord Howe, who distributed them amongst men who had distinguished themselves in the battle’. Gold examples of several different forms, presumably for wear by officers, are also known. 

Ref: Milford Haven, Admiral The Marquess of (1919), ‘British Naval Medals, Commemorative Medals, Naval rewards’, John Murray, London.