A Signed Royal Presentation Photograph of Princess Mary, 1934
A Signed Royal Presentation Photograph of Princess Mary, 1934
A Signed Royal Presentation Photograph of Princess Mary, 1934
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Signed Royal Presentation Photograph of Princess Mary, 1934
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Signed Royal Presentation Photograph of Princess Mary, 1934
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, A Signed Royal Presentation Photograph of Princess Mary, 1934

A Signed Royal Presentation Photograph of Princess Mary, 1934

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Measurements: 34cm (13.3in) x 25cm (9.8in)

Provenance: F.H. Dudden, Chaplain to George V

Seated half length studio portrait in evening dress. Signed and dated ‘Mary / 1934’ in the lower mount in ink in the sitter’s hand. Framed with a letter verso from Sybil Kenyon-Slaney, Lady-in-Waiting to the Princess Royal, concerning the gift of the photograph to Dr Dudden during a visit to Harewood House, Leeds.

The Rev. Dr. Frederick Homes Dudden (1874–1955) was Chaplain to George V and George VI from 1929 to 1952. He was Master of Pembroke College, Oxford (1918–55) and Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University (1929–32).

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The Princess Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood (1897–1965) was the only daughter of George V. She initiated the 1914 Princess Mary's Christmas Gift Fund, given to British soldiers and sailors. She worked as a nurse at Great Ormond Street Hospital and also focused on the Girl Guide movement and Women's Services. She married Viscount Lascelles in 1922, the elder son of the 5th Earl of Harewood. Reports at the time hinted that Lascelles proposed to Mary after a wager at his club, while rumours indicated that Mary was pressured into the marriage by members of the Royal Family. In 1932, George V declared that she should bear the title Princess Royal. The Princess Royal was particularly close to her eldest brother, who subsequently became Edward VIII and Duke of Windsor. After the abdication crisis, she and her husband went to stay with the former king, at Enzenfeld Castle, Austria. In 1947 she allegedly declined to attend the wedding of her niece, Princess Elizabeth to Phillip Mountbatten to protest the fact that the Duke of Windsor had not been invited. At the outbreak of the Second World War II, the Princess Royal became chief controller and later controller commandant of the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS, renamed the Women's Royal Army Corps in 1949). In that capacity she travelled Britain visiting its units, as well as wartime canteens and other welfare organizations. Princess Mary was Colonel-in-Chief of The Royal Scots (1918); the Royal Signals (1935); and the West Yorkshire Regiment (1947). In 1945 the 10th Gurkha Rifles were retitled 10th Princess Mary's Own G.R. in her honour.