Artists’ Rifles - a Pair of Drinking Beakers, 1888 & 1890
Artists’ Rifles - a Pair of Drinking Beakers, 1888 & 1890
Artists’ Rifles - a Pair of Drinking Beakers, 1888 & 1890
Artists’ Rifles - a Pair of Drinking Beakers, 1888 & 1890
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Artists’ Rifles - a Pair of Drinking Beakers, 1888 & 1890
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Artists’ Rifles - a Pair of Drinking Beakers, 1888 & 1890

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Height: 10.8cm  10.6cm

 

Silver mounted horn. Cylindrical tapered form with glass bottoms. Each applied with a shied inscribed ‘XX Middlesex / Artists R.V. / Monthly Cup / Won by / H.D. Brook / D Company.’ Makers’ mark of Thomas Johnson II and Frederick Edmonds & Edward J. W. Johnson. Hallmarked London 1888 and 1890.

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Colonel Henry Darvill Brook, late R.A.M.C. (T.), V.D., D.L., (1859-1934) was a keen rifle shot and followed the example of like minded medical students in joining ‘D’ Company, Artists’ Rifles in 1883 which at the time recruited largely from the medical profession. He was commissioned Surgeon-Lieutenant in 1892 and later took command of a unit of the Wessex Field Ambulance. He served in the First World War on the Western Front as Assistant Director of Medical Services with the 55th Division.

His obituary notice in the Artists’ Rifles Gazette records, ’From his early days in the Artists, Col. Brook took the keenest interest in rifle shooting, which he continued until the last. As Chairman of the Hampshire Rifle Association he did much to encourage the art of rifle shooting among the younger generation, by whom he will be greatly missed. He was a prominent figure at the Wimbledon meetings of the N.R.A. in the days of the Snider rifle, and from then never missed the annual rifle meetings. The Sunday before his death he shot through King's conditions at Bisley, making a highly creditable score, whilst on the following Saturday, in accordance with his wishes, his ashes were scattered over the Bisley ranges, the N.R.A. having all targets lowered to "half-mast" during the short ceremony, the marksmen, numbering some four to five hundred, standing bare-headed on their various firing points making a very impressive scene and one unique in the annals of Bisley.’