North Irish Horse Presentation Plaque, 1910
North Irish Horse Presentation Plaque, 1910
North Irish Horse Presentation Plaque, 1910
North Irish Horse Presentation Plaque, 1910
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, North Irish Horse Presentation Plaque, 1910
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North Irish Horse Presentation Plaque, 1910

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Overall: 22.5cm (8.8in) x 19cm (7.5in)

Silver. The crowned harp insignia of the North Irish Horse over a presentation plaque inscribed 'To Viscount Jocelyn from the members of his troop on his leaving the regiment’, both elements mounted on a velvet covered easel backed presentation plaque. Maker’s mark of the Sheffield silversmiths Walker & Hall. Hallmarked 1910.

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Viscount Jocelyn (1883-1956) was commissioned into the North Irish Horse, Special Reserve in 1909, resigned his commission in 1910, but rejoined in January 1912. He was promoted Lieutenant shortly after the regiment’s annual summer camp at Dundrum, Co. Down, on 1 August 1914. On the declaration of war against Germany three days later, Jocelyn’s squadron, A Squadron, under the command of Major Lord Cole and comprising six other officers and 166 other ranks, was designated to accompany the British Expeditionary Force. Together with the South Irish Horse’s B Squadron, they sailed from Dublin on the S.S. Architect on 17 August 1914 for Le Harve. They were the first non-regular troops to land in France and be in action in the First World War. They were joined shortly afterwards by C Squadron of the North Irish Horse under the command of another aristocrat Major Lord Massereene and Ferrard. A Squadron whilst attached G.H.Q. at Le Cateau served both in the line in support of the 3rd Division and as bodyguard and escort to the Commander-in-Chief, Sir John French, during the B.E.F.’s retreat from Mons.

Lord Jocelyn was afterwards present during the Battle of the Marne, the advance to and Battle of the Aisne (6th September, 1st October and 12-15th September respectively). There is a reference to Jocelyn in the memoirs of medical officer Travis Hampson, who wrote that on 1 September 1914: ‘After messing about for a bit helping to get things straight - there were no billets and everyone had to doss down just anywhere - Hull and I opened a bottle of whiskey, a great treat. It had been given to me by Lord Jocelyn of the Northern Irish Horse a few days before; they ran a decent mess.’ Then on 19 November 1914 Lord Jocelyn was invalided home. Sickness confined him to duties at the regiment's Antrim headquarters for the next few years. He was promoted Captain in 1915, and the following December he succeeded his father as the 8th Earl of Roden. In June 1917 he was elected a Representative Peer for Ireland and served in the House of Lords from 1919 until his death. He was described by his grandson, the 10th Earl Roden, as ‘austere’.