Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890
Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890
Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890
Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890
Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890
Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890
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Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890

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Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll Tartanware Blotter, 1890

30.7cm (12in) x 23.2cm (9.1in)

 

Silver, varnished paper over wood. Tartanware blotter, the front cover named ‘Princess Louise’ and mounted with a central silver oval plaque engraved with the coronet of a royal princess over initials ‘L.C.A.’ for Louise Caroline Alberta, Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll (1848-1939). The blotter containing Royal ephemera, including two printed programmes for 'Tableaux Vivants' at Osborne (January 1891) and Balmoral Castle (October 1890), three typed Windsor Castle dinner lists (June and July 1890), a 4th Rifle Brigade band programme, and a manuscript dinner list.

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Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, V.A., C.I., G.C.V.O., G.B.E., R.R.C., (1848-1939) was the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Her early life was spent moving among the various royal residences in the company of her family. When her father died in December 1861, the court went into a long period of mourning, to which with time Louise became unsympathetic. She was a talented sculptor and artist, and several of her sculptures remain today. She was also a supporter of the feminist movement, corresponding with Josephine Butler, and visiting Elizabeth Garrett.

Before her marriage to John Campbell, Marquess of Lorne, the heir of the Duke of Argyll in 1871, Louise served as an unofficial secretary to the Queen from 1866. In 1878, Lorne was appointed Governor General of Canada, a post he held 1878–1884. Louise was viceregal consort, starting a lasting interest in Canada. Her names were used to name many features in Canada, including Lake Louise and the province of Alberta. Following her mother's death in 1901, she entered the social circle established by her elder brother, the new king, Edward VII. Louise was devastated by Lorne's death in 1914. After the First World War she began to retire from public life, undertaking few public duties outside Kensington Palace, where she died at the age of 91.