A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George VI, 1937
A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George VI, 1937
A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George VI, 1937
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A Gold Staff Officer’s Baton Carried at the Coronation of George VI, 1937

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Painted wood. The upper end bearing the crowned cypher of George VI and ‘Coronation / 1937’. Such batons were issued as a staff of office to those who acted marshals in Westminster Abbey on Coronation Day 1937.

The 1937 Coronation Gold Staff Officers numbered 300 senior officers in all. They were rehearsed in their ushering duties for two days under the General-in-Charge, Major-General Sir Eric Girdwood. The Gold Staffs were divided into groups and sub-divided into sections, each its own commander who were mostly Colonels or Generals. Each section comprised 9 to 12 Gold Staffs with a block seats allotted to them. The Gold Staffs met the Coronation service guests at one or other of the entrances and escorted them to their seats.